Characterization

In A Thousand Pieces of You, the main character is Marguerite Caine. So far the way the author has revealed the character is by what she says. She’s really determined to find and kill Paul Markov to avenge her father. When Theo tells her that he’s gonna go after Paul with one of the Firebird prototypes Marguerite immediately tells him that she’s going with him. Then when she gets to the new dimension she writes down really big on a brick wall, KILL PAUL MARKOV.  Marguerite tells the reader about how she’s different from the rest of her family. She likes to paint and is into art while her parents are physicists and are making inventions that are changing the world. She knows somethings about science and traveling to other dimensions because she was home-schooled by her parents. I feel like I haven’t actually learned that much about any of the characters. Another character in the book is named Theo. The author reveals his character with the things he does and what Marguerite says about him. Marguerite mostly talks about how much of a flirt Theo is and how he flirts with every girl he sees. Theo is the person that starts this mission. He’s the one who said he was going to go the Paul first. Which shows how much loyalty he has to Marguerite’s parents. Also, when Theo and Marguerite find out they are in the same dimension, but Theo is in America and Marguerite is in England. So, Theo buys a ticket to the next flight to England. Then, Marguerite has to go to a bar and drink a lot because she has to act like the Marguerite from that dimension and Theo finds her and takes her home. Then the next morning he makes Marguerite’s aunt and her blueberry pancakes. Which shows how kind he is and that he’s a good friend. To be honest, the author hasn’t revealed much about the characters. I even looked up reviews of the book and thing that most of the people complained about was the characterization. I hope that I will at least learn a little bit more about the characters.

Reading Log 1- A Thousand Pieces of You

The book I am reading is called A Thousand Pieces of You. After I read the summary on the back of the book I thought it sounded really interesting and decided to start reading it. It’s about a girl named Marguerite Caine who’s parents are brilliant physicists. Her mother’s new invention called the Firebird allows people to travel through dimensions. When a man named Paul Markov murders her father and steals her mother’s invention Marguerite and her parents’ assistant Theo decide to use prototypes of the Firebird to track him down. Marguerite doesn’t plan on just tracking him down she plans on killing him. The book starts right when she jumps into another dimension. She is in a dimension where her family lives in England and doesn’t know how much time she has until her consciousness leaves that dimension. Marguerite isn’t into science like her parents, even though she was homeschooled by them, she is more into the arts and plans on going to Rhode Island School of Design in the fall. I’m more into science than painting so I can’t understand how she could want to go off to an art school when her parents just built a device that lets people travel through different dimensions. Also, I think it’s insane that she’s traveling through different dimensions trying to track down and kill her father’s murderer even when she knows there are billions of dimensions and almost impossible to actually find Paul. She also left her mom alone on the day of her dad’s death. This probably made her mother even more upset because she just lost her husband and now she doesn’t know when or if she’ll see her daughter again. Now I’m going to go back to talking about how many dimensions there could be. In a study in 2009, “Stanford physicists Andrei Linde and Vitaly Vanchurin have calculated the number of all possible universes, coming up with an answer of 10^10^16” (Lisa Zyga, phys.org). That’s not all, “the scientists explain that it would have been even more humongous, except that we observers are limited in our ability to distinguish more universes; otherwise, there could be as many as 10^10^10^7 universes”  (Lisa Zyga, phys.org).