blog: fourth quarter ir

After going through the list of all the authors that I could choose from, I chose Flannery O’Connor. I knew from the start that I would want to choose a female author due to the time period that the majority of these authors are from. As most people know, females weren’t treated with the highest respect back then. So having an author that’s a female, I wanted to see if how society treated women would follow through with her work. Honestly, it was quite a process trying to pick a female author. Most of them were poets, and I knew for sure I was absolutely not going to pick an author who was a poet. As much as I love poetry, I struggled with that unit. Fortunately, Flannery O’Connor’s primary form of work is short stories, which is what intrigued me to pick her for this project. Three of the most interesting works by Flannery O’Connor is “Everything That Rises Must Converge”, “The Habit of Being”, and “A Good Man Is Hard To Find.” All interest me quite the same, but I find “A Good Man is Hard To Find” quite comical, and the two others come across as very personal. Doing some research I found out that Flannery O’Connor was a very devout Catholic, and that definitely plays a role in her work. Also, it is quite ironic that she has a book called “A Good Man Is Hard To Find” because she was never married, and she had no kids. She also only lived to 39, but during her 39 years from 1925 to 1964, she has gone through the Great Depression all the way to the Civil Rights Movement.

 

blog: fourth quarter ir

blog: huck finn initial impressions

Image result for huck finn

So far I’ve been liking Huck Finn, from telling seniors that we’ve finally started reading the “Adventures of Huckleberry Finn” and receiving groans, laughs, or any negative reaction, I was a little skeptical if I was going to be a fan of this book. Although we’re just in the very early chapters, I’m fairly enjoying the book. Huck’s story is for sure an interesting one, and it doesn’t seem so cliche or predictable. He already is on an adventure from the start, maybe not the most delightful, adventure seeking experience, but it’s all apart of Huck’s story. I’m surprised that I’ve liked this book from the start due to more books that we read in school I dread, and I could fall asleep reading. Even though the “Adventures of Huckleberry Finn” was written way back in 1883, it truly is a timeless story. Something I like that I didn’t think I would is that the story is written colloquially. Most words are spelled a little wonky, but whenever I read the book silently to myself  I get to read it from Huck’s point of view in this kind of country accent that I think he has. I also enjoy that the story is written in first person point of view, with that being said I am very fond of when Huck breaks the fourth wall. I just think that’s neat because of how long ago the book was written. If there was something I would say that I’m not a fan of, it’d for sure be Pap Finn. Mark Twain has done a great job of building this character that is so easy to dislike. Everything about Pap grinds my gears, and I wish that Huck would have shot him, but it shows that Huck has a heart which draws my liking to Huck’s character more and more.

blog: huck finn initial impressions

blog: end of song

Before diving into Walt Whitman’s “Song of Myself” I was very skeptical on how I felt toward dissecting the poem. Not going to lie, I was very confused when we first read the poem. It took more than just a couple of times to fully understand what was I reading. I was still learning more and more about the poem as my group was presenting. All in all, taking it line by line, it was much easier to understand the meaning behind Whitman’s words. I was very fond of the poem, although it was a struggle to decipher. I enjoyed how even though the poem was written awhile ago, it is still timeless. It still is applicable to today’s day and age. As you can tell, Whitman is trying to influence those who read “Song of Myself” to become more unified, and generally better society. Other than my own sections, I was drawn to section three. Section three of the poem goes into to detail of the good and bad in the world, and it is supposed to be an eye-opener to readers saying how we are all apart of the same world, even though the world is home to so many different ideas. Since we are all apart of the same world, we are all equal. No one is higher or lower than another, and that’s a great lesson especially in today’s society having people in power and in control. The lesson of all of us being equal is what I took away from section three.  I don’t really have any questions or remarks due to our class discussion, but I did enjoy this very long poem overall. At least I can say I’ve read one of America’s most classic and influential poems.Image result for song of myself

blog: end of song

blog: vertigo

Image result for vertigo alfred hitchcockI have always been a fan of psychological thrillers, knowing that we were going to watch one for ourselves in class was in a way relieving. This was an assignment I for sure was more appealed to than the others. So far Vertigo has been an okay film. I have very high expectations for it, and personally, it started out kind of slow. You have to be very tentative during the film, there are lots of things to pick up on. There are lots of symbols, allusions, foreshadowing. Things that typically you wouldn’t consider a big detail in the film is. I understand that the film was made way back when, but I  wasn’t a fan of how females were so dependent on males. We’ve come along way in today’s society when it comes to women being independent, but I really did not like the way females were portrayed in the film. Other than that I really enjoy the story of the film, halfway through it seems pretty cliche. You have the spy that retired, and he ends up following a girl in a case that he’s assigned, but he falls in love with her. How cliche can you get? But knowing that this is an Alfred Hitchcock movie, there is nothing cliche about that. Even though so far it’s a cliche storyline, it’s something I’m drawn to. I like how Alfred Hitchcock can let you connect to the characters by drawing the story out hence why I said how the film started out slow. Through the main character’s backstory, we can really understand the way he thinks and his thoughts unlike some of the other characters. Finally, another thing I would say I’m a fan of would be the videography in the film. The editing and the cool effects really tie the film in all together. All in all, I’m really enjoying the film so far and my critique of it would be very positive.

 

blog: vertigo

blog: ir, twain, & finn

Image result for mark twainMark Twain’s “The Celebrated Jumping Frog of Calaveras County” was a short story that I was fairly fond of. Not only did it have a message of showing how high society thinks and acts and thinks towards those who aren’t as wealthy, but it was a funny story as well. Since the story was written in colloquial, the reader could really grasp how it was written in first person point of view. Twain is making fun of the anonymous narrator who comes off as the most intelligent person in the story. Surprisingly the person that the narrator who comes off as dumb is the smartest person in the story. The narrator treats Simon Wheeler fairly differently, and “dumbs” it down for him. This drives Twain’s point for the story of how high society treats others differently.

My first impression of Huck Finn was how I was gravitated towards how Mark Twain included himself, as the author, from Huck’s point of view. You don’t really see that in a story, so reading that was something different, but different in a good way. I think Huck Finn is going to be about a story of adventure due to Huck and his uncivilized ways, with someone trying to change that, he only sticks it out for his friend Tom Sawyer. If Huck stays with Widow Douglas than he’ll be able to join Tom again.

blog: ir, twain, & finn