blog: thoreau’s attempt

Reading “Walden” by Thoreau was a whole lot easier than reading “The Divinity School Address.” Giving my brain a break, and reading through Walden was good. Although Emerson and Thoreau are different. One, being all talk and saying how we should live our lives than not doing it. While the other is actually doing what they preach, both thoughts have the same connection with nature throughout. The thought of we is a part of nature nor greater nor smaller. The main idea of the first portion of “Where I Lived and What I Lived For” was where are you living? Where are you spending your time to find yourself? Thoreau goes to Walden and spends two years of his life there. Then throughout the conclusion, we see what Thoreau gains from that experience. You could benefit a lot by leaving society to and live in the woods. Even doing that temporarily you can benefit from that. You can find out who you truly are. Who you are when others are not around. Typically people will paint a different persona on when there are others, but can you really be fake to yourself? Not only can you find yourself but you can learn to be thankful for what you have and using the resources that nature gives to you, hence simplifying your life. Thoreau learns how to simplify his life. It’s a word he couldn’t express enough. You can learn what your real necessities in life are. The biggest thing a reader should take out of the material we have read for Transcendentalism is again, we are apart of something so much bigger than ourselves.

blog: thoreau’s attempt

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