blog no. 8 no smiles here

Reading the title “a smile,” I immediately thought this was going to be a nice, happy, and laid back poem. Boy was I dead wrong. This poem did everything but make me smile. My first read through this poem had me so lost, and I had no clue what was going on. My initial thought was that it looked like a bunch of words were thrown onto a piece of paper. Having a number of different stanzaic forms for sure threw me off. My first question I would have would be why the different types of stanzaic forms? Why was the poem organized the way it was? I had no idea if it was just for presentation, or if there was some sort of deep philosophical meaning behind it.
After reading this poem a billion times, and barely knowing what the hell was going on, I came to the conclusion that this poem was about someone who’s hurt, depressed, anything but smiling, faking a smile and painting a persona of happiness. The bear is a metaphor for problems. This person is being chased by his problems, and he can’t escape. I merely thought the title “a smile” was ironic due to this being one of the most depressing poems I’ve read. Well after a discussion in class, we were told that the title is so much more than just the title. It plays a big role into the theme of the poem. So I scratched that idea of the poem being a joke, and started fresh again. I was struggling a lot trying to decipher what in the world was going on. If it weren’t for the help of other classmates and the footnotes at the bottom I would be completely lost. Other than complaining, I was a big fan of the Eagle’s reference and having Hotel California, Already Gone, and Love Will Keep Us Alive being used as allusions throughout the poem.
I’m not saying I disliked the poem, yes it was very confusing, but if it’s a good poem you can’t just read it once and understand what’s going on.

blog no. 8 no smiles here

blog no. 7

Poetry is so much more than rhyme and putting your emotions into words. I give so much credit to poets, because I have no idea how they do it. I don’t hate nor dislike poetry, it’s just something that doesn’t get me excited. My experience with poetry wasn’t half that bad. It was better than most. Indulging yourself into a piece of work and depicting the meaning of every stanza, line, and word was for sure an experience. I’ve been a fan of the work we’ve read so far in class, except my dislike poem. I thought having to go through the sound and sense questions were a pain, but they honestly really did help with trying to figure out what the meaning of the poems were. Finally being able to understand what a poem’s true meaning was after analyzing felt pretty good, and my dislike for poetry grew smaller and smaller. Writing a poem put me in a completely different perspective. It was pretty difficult, even to think of what to write was hard. When finally coming up with an idea and trying to put my thoughts into a poem is what really threw me off. Having to write a poem, and instead of analyzing one really allowed myself to go more in depth with poetry. There is definitely more to it. Although struggling trying to write in stanzaic form I do prefer it over free verse. It helped me keep my ideas and words organized, instead of spilling my words out on paper. Through all the struggle of reading and analyzing poems, I love the use of repetition in poetry, when it’s used correctly. My like poem, “ O, Captain! My, Captain!” by Walt Whitman, uses repetition throughout the poem. The use of repetition showed the importance of certain words or lines throughout the poem, but it also created a beautiful flow to the poem as well.
Poetry will never be my forte, but I might as well get used to it because it won’t be leaving me anytime soon. Although I have for sure gained a better respect for poetry.

blog no. 7